Program & Speakers


September 5th

9.30 am

Registration and welcome coffee


10.00 am

Greeting
Holger Wandsleb (Ministry of Education, Science and Culture Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania)
Introduction
Gerald Jurasinski (University of Rostock, Germany)


10.15 am

Two decades of rewetting in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania - development of biota and greenhouse gas exchange

  • Florian Jansen (University of Rostock, Germany)
  • Benjamin Herold (State Office for Environment Brandenburg, Germany)
  • Jürgen Augustin & Mathias Hoffmann (Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research ZALF, Germany)
  • Torsten Sachs (GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences)
  • Franziska Koebsch (University of Rostock, Germany)

12.00 am

Lunch


1.00 pm

Excursion to the polder Zarnekow


4.00 pm

Coffee break


5.00 pm

Poster Session
Each poster will be presented within 2 minutes


8.00 pm

Get together with venison and music



September 6th

8.30 am

Hydrology and microbiology of rewetted peatlands

  • Gunnar Lischeid (Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research ZALF and University of Potsdam, Institute of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Germany)
  • Alfons J.P. Smolders (Radboud University Nijmegen, Netherlands)
  • Paul Bodelier (Netherlands Institute of Ecology, Netherlands)
  • Susanne Liebner (GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Germany)
  • Tim Urich (University of Greifswald, Germany)

10.10 am

Coffee break


10.30 am

Biogeochemistry of rewetted peatlands worldwide

  • Bärbel Tiemeyer (Johann Heinrich von Thünen Institute, Germany)
  • Jeroen Geurts (Radboud University, Netherlands)
  • Camiel Aggenbach (University of Antwerp, Belgium)
  • Klaus-Holger Knorr (University of Münster, Germany)
  • David Wilson (Earthy matters, Ireland)

12.30 am

Lunch


1.30 pm

Joint discussion paper on the state of the art in inundated peatland research
Gerald Jurasinki (University of Rostock, Germany), Dominik Zak (Aarhus University, Denmark)


4.00 pm

Closing coffee break


Moderators: Dominik Zak (Aarhus University, Denmark) & Gerald Jurasinski (University of Rostock, Germany)

Speaker profiles

Bärbel Tiemeyer, Johann Heinrich von Thünen Institute
What was your first contact with peatlands?
The first conscious contact with peatlands was an excursion to a re-wetting project in the “Wurzacher Ried” in Bavaria on a very hot summer day. I was fascinated by the co-existence of an at least 50 degree hot peat surface and cool ponds within meters distance and decided that this was something I wanted to study.
Which mire you have been was so far the most beautiful?
I’ve visited several Finnish peatlands which all have been really impressive, but probably the most beautiful was the Torronsuo National Park.
What is your preferred season in this landscape?
Autumn – just imagine the fog raising in the morning and revealing the colours of mosses, shrubs and trees!

Dominik Zak, Aarhus University
What fascinates you about peatlands?
Being on peatland I had often the feeling that the time slowed down. Especially on living bogs there 2 m high trees surrounding you can be several decades old. Stepping into this quite world of strangers gives you a special feeling of “mothers earth” her fertility but also her vulnerability.
What is your preferred season in this landscape?
Even I love all of the seasons, for me the spring time is the most favored on visiting peatlands. You can lay down in the moss without becoming attacked by all these thirsty horseflies and mosquitos.
What was your most interesting encounter in a mire?
I was visiting once a large bog in Estonia during summer midnight. My colleagues were collecting moths and I was following a board walk pulling me more and more into the center of the peatland. It was not completely dark because it was the time of the white nights. Suddenly the whole landscape was immersed by blue flashlights at irregular intervals. I assume I have seen jack o' lantern and I have seen it never again.

Paul Bodelier, Netherlands Institute of Ecology
What fascinates you about peatlands?
I like the close proximity of so many different ecological niches, especially the oxic/anoxic conditions giving room to many processes and organisms.
What was your most interesting encounter in a mire?
Actually that was a terrible thunderstorm in a peatland in the vicinity of Prague when we were in the middle of it.
What is your preferred season in this landscape?
I think that would be late summer when vigorous bubbling of methane is at its best!

Benjamin Herold, State Office for Environment Brandenburg
What was your first contact with peatlands?
I discovered a nest of a White-tailed Eagle in the Kieshofer Moor in 1998.
Which mire you have been was so far the most beautiful?
The “Große Rosin” in the Peene-valley: Once vast, later devastated, now very wet.
What was your most interesting encounter in a mire?
I found out, that between 21:00 and 5:00 is the best time in an inundated peatland. You definitely don`t get to meet people, but wildlife gets even more wild.

Florian Jansen, Landscape ecology and Site Evaluation, University of Rostock
What was your first contact with peatlands?
I remember visiting the High Fens (Eifel Nature Park) with my parents, a complex of heathlands and blanket bogs, being impressed by the vast landscape, seeing plants and mosses I had never seen before.
The full richness of mire types I did not realize before my studies in Greifswald.
From your point of view, what is the greatest future challenge for peatland research in the next 20 years?
The greatest challenges since decades and for the next decades will be protection and restoration of mires and not research. At least for Central European mires it will be a great challenge to explore the relationship between upward growing peat and displacement peat in groundwater-fed fens to sharpen our understanding of mire developments. In a landscape perspective it is crucial to understand the interplay between climate and landuse of the surrounding landscape for the (historical) development of mires.
What is your preferred season in this landscape?
Summer, because than I can go barefooted into the mires.

Alfons J.P. Smolders, Radboud University Nijmegen and B-WARE
From your point of view, what is the greatest future challenge for peatland research in the next 20 years?
I would say, that one of the greatest challenges for peatland research is to find out how we can restore degraded peatlands. Destroying them as well as preserving them can be a challenge too, but, in general, is much easier.
What have you ever lost in peatlands?
I have lost too many things in peatlands, but I have never lost my admiration for these beautiful systems.
Have you ever gotten stuck?
Yes, and it took me more than two hours to free myself. It was very cold and rainy on an Irish bog and my colleagues had left to have a lunch and to warm up a little bit in a nice Irish pub. I volunteered to stay on the bog, on my own, to collect the remaining water samples. When they finally came back I had just managed to free myself.

Gunnar Lischeid, Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF) and University of Potsdam, Institute of Earth and Environmental Sciences
What was your first contact with peatlands?
Losing my rubber boots as a child.
What fascinates you about peatlands?
Steep hydraulic and biogeochemical gradients in space and time that induce high turnover rates.
What have you ever lost in peatlands?
Faith in simple mechanistic concepts.

Jürgen Augustin, Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF)
From your point of view, what is the greatest future challenge for peatland research in the next 20 years?
A more reliable assessment of the future biogeochemistry of revitalized peatlands.
What is your preferred season in this landscape?
Autumn.
Which mire you have been was so far the most beautiful?
The pristine bogs in the northwest of Belarus.

Gerald Jurasinski, University of Rostock
What was your most interesting encounter in a mire?
While sitting and explaining plant determination with a Bachelor student, she jumped off because a baby wild boar was rubbing against her back. Then the baby wild boar ran excited between us a few times and finally escaped back into the wild and we were afraid that its mama would come angry at us very soon so we switched place immediately.
Have you ever gotten stuck?
Once, in the early days of our work in Hütelmoor, I nearly drowned in a ditch because I slided into it at the bank and then the water was flowing into my hip waders.
What fascinates you about peatlands?
That even in vicinity to heavily used landscapes they often provide a sense of true naturalness.

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